Music

Only the Wild Ones," by Dispatch

This, from a friend: “I've been enjoying this song for the last year or so, but came across the video for the first time last night. I cried as I watched it with my kids. Thought you might enjoy.”

Long hair and longer stride
Skateboard fair with a primal tribe
And your cut off painter pants
Chargin' down the craggy mountains with our thrift store friends

And who you find so
So in love with the falling earth
Oh you wake in the middle of the falling night
With the summer playing coy

In the attics of the city night
We talked corso and the MC5
And you could dance live
We were all alright

And only the wild ones
Give you something and never want it back
Oh the riot and the rush of the warm night air
Only the wild ones
Are the ones you can never catch
Stars are up now no place to go, but everywhere

One I met in the green mountain state
I dropped out, and he moved away
Heard he got some land down south
Changed his name to a name the birds could pronounce

And only the wild ones
Give you something and never want it back
Oh the riot and the rush of the warm night air
Only the wild ones
Are the ones you can never catch
Stars are up now no place to go but everywhere
(No place to go but everywhere)

And in the city the mayor said
Those who dance are all mislead
So you packed your things and moved to the other coast
Said you gonna be like Charlie Rose

And only the wild ones
Give you something and never want it back
Oh the riot and the rush of the warm night air
Only the wild ones
Are the ones you can never catch
Stars are up now no place to go, but everywhere

Only the wild ones, give you something and never want it back
Oh the riot and rush of the warm night air
Only the wild ones
Are the ones you can never catch
Stars are up now no place to go, but anywhere
Hmm, hmm hmm
Hmm, hmm hmm
Hmm, hmm hmm


Unchained Melody : Elvis' Last Great Moment

 October 2nd 1948, Elvis made his first public appearance

October 2nd 1948, Elvis made his first public appearance

"In one of his final performances before his tragic death, Elvis Presley delivered an incredible rendition of ‘Unchained Melody’ during a concert in Rapid City, South Dakota on June 21, 1977.

The performance, described as 'the last great moment of his career', was recorded for his last television special two months before his death in August 1977" (via). 

The Rolling Stone writes:

He had an enlarged heart, an enlarged intestine, hypertension and incredibly painful bowel problems. He was barely sleeping and should have probably been in the hospital, but he was still a huge draw on the concert circuit and the money was too good to turn down.
 

As guitarist Charlie Hodge held a microphone, Elvis dug deep and poured his heart into the song. His body was falling apart, but his voice remained almost as powerful as ever. Without any doubt, it’s the last great moment of his career.

I've never been a huge Elvis fan (although my son and I both enjoy In the Ghetto), but after listening to Malcolm Gladwell describe the sad and lonely life he must have lived, I at least see him differently. Watching this moment, as the camera zooms in on an overweight and dying man, I cannot help but wonder if the reason why he dug so deep and poured out his heart was because it suddenly became the song of his life.

Then, at the 2:34 mark, there's a look, then a smile, almost like he's remembering who and what he was. It's almost like he's saying, "I still got it." And then he gets after it. Because time goes by, "so slowly", and when it's at the end, it can suddenly seem too fast. "And time can do so much." 

 

His youth is gone, his fame dwindling, the end is near. Perhaps, as he sings this song, he knows it's his last, that life is leaving him. And so he sings, "Wait for me" with all that he has, harkening back to what he was, hoping. But in less then three months later, his body and mind will succumb to the brokenness and fatigue, leaving us, and Elvis, with this last great moment. Which, befittingly, doesn't seem to be enough.

Oh, my love, my darling
I've hungered for your touch
A long, lonely time
Time goes by so slowly
And time can do so much
Are you still mine?
I need your love
I need your love
God speed your love to me

Lonely rivers flow
To the sea, to the sea
To the open arms of the sea
Lonely rivers sigh
"Wait for me, wait for me"
I'll be coming home, wait for me

Oh, my love, my darling
I've hungered, for your touch
A long, lonely time
Time goes by so slowly
And time can do so much
Are you still mine?
I need your love
I need your love
God speed your love to me

For more on . . .

-N- Stuff  :  On Living :  Music  Elvis

 

Why We Should Live Like Conductors

The role of a conductor is to organize the music and keep everything calm."

 

You should make the audience want to dance although you shouldn't be a circus act. I think people should focus on the music, and not the conductor.

This role, this pursuit, made me think of Joe Buck and his phisophy of calling games. When asked, "What bothers you in an announcer that you feel isn't measuring up?" Buck responded with,

"Over talking, doing too much, trying to prove to the audience that they did their reading, trying to make the call about themselves . . . I just want to state what happened. I want to do it an exciting way. I haven't always accomplished that, by the way. And I want to get out of the viewer's head. It's not about me. Nobody's tuning in - let's check the TV Guide listings and see what game Joe Buck is calling. Nobody cares. They want to see the Cubs. They want to see the Packers. They want to see the Cowboys. They don't care who's calling the game . . . if I get hit by a bus going into a game, they're still going to play. And the guys that bother me, without naming names, are the guys who sound like if they got hit by that bus, the game would be canceled" (via)

And when it comes to moments of great climactic celebration, moments where announces can make a name for themselves, moments like the Cubs winning the World Series for the first time in 108 years, Joe Buck didn't try to keep everyone calm or insert himself into the moment. Instead, he kept quiet. "I could choose to make that call all about me," he says, "screaming and yelling and, you know, 'groundball to Kris Bryant, going to be a tough play, out at first. And for the first time in 108 years, the Chicago Cubs have finally won it all. They gather on the mound. Players jumping over'", but he didn't. He didn't say any of that stuff, because it wasn't about him. It was about something bigger. 

I wonder how many other professions would do well to adapt a similar philosophy. How many companies, schools, communities, and relationships have crumbled because the man or woman in charge is trying to make it about themselves, forgetting that if they were gone, the game would still go on.

People like: 

- Teachers/Principals
- Parents
- CEO's
- Pastors
- Presidents/world leaders

How many of them, of us, make the moments of life - both big and small - about us, and not the bigger picture? And in so doing, ruin everything?

Really, for me, it comes down to humilitas and the belief that we should be using (or withholding) our gifts and talents for the benefit of others, not just ourselves. Just like a conductor. 

Keep everything calm, inspire dance, help people focus on the music. 

 

For more on . . .

-N- Stuff  :  On Living Music  :  Joe Buck  : Do Orchestras Really Need Conductors?

Here I am, by The Boxer Rebellion

Fell in love with this song today, Here I am, by The Boxer Rebellion.

 I'll follow, blindly, however unlikely, that I'd find you, I'd find you. I just knew.

Here I am.

I lost you once I don't wanna lose you again.

This song is haunting and deeply moving. Yet, somehow, it is also romantic, in a raw and dangerously open sort of way.

The melody, the violin and piano, the pacing and the buildup. The pleading, "Here I am," and "I don't want to lose you again."

It's terrible and sad. Yet, so beautiful.

And I just love it.

 

For more on . . .

-N- Stuff  :  Music  :  Music Videos

John Williams conducting the opening fanfare for The Last Jedi

Here's John Williams, conducting one of the most iconic musical pieces in movie making history - the opening fanfare for Star Wars: The Last Jedi. 

Yet, when it's all over, no one seems to notice.

Williams flips the pages and several people cough. One guy scratches his neck and nose, unaware of what just happened. That with just a few cords, goosebumps raised on the arms of children everywhere, that nostalgic memories were instantly recalled and created, and that millions of people, all over the world, were suddenly transported to a galaxy far, far away.

And that's pretty awesome. 

 

For more on . . .

-N- Stuff  :  Fanfare for the Common Man  :  Music  :  Star Wars

 

BE SURE TO SCROLL DOWN AND SUBSCRIBE - THANKS FOR READING!

Ludovico Einaudi : Elegy for the Arctic

On the Arctic Ocean, with a grand piano floating on a platform and against the backdrop of the Wahlenbergbreen glacier (in Svalbard, Norway), Einaudi plays an original piece composed in the hope of protecting the Arctic (via).

I just love the scene, near the minute-thirty mark, when the glacier seems to respond by casting itself into the ocean, like it's trying to reach him. Like it's trying to reach us.

Is anybody listening?

 

For more on . . .

-N- Stuff  :  Inspiring Art  :  Classical Music

The sound of history, from trees.

A record player that plays slices of wood : Year ring data translated into music.

A tree’s year rings are analysed for their strength, thickness and rate of growth. This data serves as basis for a generative process that outputs piano music. It is mapped to a scale which is again defined by the overall appearance of the wood (ranging from dark to light and from strong texture to light texture). The foundation for the music is certainly found in the defined ruleset of programming and hardware setup, but the data acquired from every tree interprets this ruleset very differently (via). 

years_5-640x422.jpg

A limited edition recording of ‘Years’ can be found here.
A regular 12″ vinyl LP edition of ‘Years’ can be found here.
A digital album consisting of seven different recorded trees can be downloaded here.

And more of Bartholomäus Traubeck works can be found here.

 

For more on . . .

-N- Stuff  :  Creativity  :  Inspiring Art  :  Music

 

BE SURE TO SCROLL DOWN AND SUBSCRIBE - THANKS FOR READING!

Beyonce : How to make lemonade

How To Make Lemonade is Beyonce's newest work - a collector's edition box set. "The retrospective will includes a 600-page hardcover book comprising unseen photos from the making of the audiovisual album, personal writing by Beyonce and handwritten lyrics and poetry by Warsaw Shire" (via). 

If we dance to survive, than Beyonce and company are thriving. 

Damn. She's good.

 

For more on . . .

-N- Stuff  :  Art  :  Beyonce Videos

 

BE SURE TO SCROLL DOWN AND SUBSCRIBE - THANKS FOR READING!